This week we begin with an article on the impact of fake news and misinformation in the age of coronavirus. The next piece is on individuals owning and selling personal data as a commodity and how it might not be good for personal privacy in the long run. Then, we have a story on how gaps in the use of big data to fight the COVID-19 pandemic might compromise public safety and threaten human rights. After this, we have 3 graphs that seem to indicate a global slowdown in deaths due to COVID-19. Lastly, we have an article on Hollywood movie studios suspending the release of weekly box office data owing to massive theater shutdowns, across the globe.

Fake News In The Age Of COVID-19

Over the last four years, fake news has become an everyday expression, and a major part of any discourse around the media. But what is the impact of fake news in this strange new age of COVID-19?

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You Really Don’t Want to Sell Your Data

As countries play catch-up to ensure the safety of their citizens—with 2.5 billion people now in lockdown—policymakers are holding up data on the spread and proliferation of the virus as a linchpin of the response.

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Big Data Could Undermine the Covid-19 Response

THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC has spurred interest in big data to track the spread of the fast-moving pathogen and to plan disease prevention efforts. But the urgent need to contain the outbreak shouldn’t cloud thinking about big data’s potential to do more harm than good.

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Three Graphs That Show a Global Slowdown in COVID-19 Deaths

Almost as soon as the COVID-19 pandemic began, graphs and many other visualisations charting the rise of the virus started to multiply. Many show the cumulative number of deaths attributed to the virus. This number, of course, will always rise, but will also – eventually – plateau. A cumulative total can never fall.

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Hollywood movie studios suspend release of box office data after coronavirus slump

Movie studios Walt Disney and Universal Pictures said on Thursday they were suspending the release of box office data because of the closure of movie theaters in multiple countries in a bid to contain the coronavirus.

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Source: https://bit.ly/3cjbcBv

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