This week we start with the data leak at Clearview AI, a facial recognition technology firm, that exposed their entire list of customers – including the names of various law enforcement agencies. After this is a story about the police forces of 10 EU nations and their plan to build a network of facial recognition databases. The next article is about a database being created by activists to expose companies that mandate arbitration over litigation, to resolve sexual harassment cases. Following this is a piece on how Dubai has started leveraging open data on bus routes for public convenience. Lastly, we cover an initiative by Cambridge University to develop a comprehensive framework on valuing of data.

Clearview AI, The Company Whose Database Has Amassed 3 Billion Photos, Hacked

Clearview AI, the company whose database has amassed over 3 billion photos, has suffered a data breach, it has emerged.

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Leak shows EU police aim to create an international facial recognition database

EU police forces plan to build a network of national police facial recognition databases covering every member state, according to internal documents obtained by The Intercept.

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New database aims to expose companies that make employees arbitrate sexual harassment claims

The activist behind the #GrabYourWallet campaign, which urged boycotts of retailers carrying products from Trump family businesses, has a new target: the confidential procedures used by many employers to bury sexual harassment claims — and that have come under increasing fire from activists.

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Dubai becomes first Arab city to use public transport open data

Dubai’s Roads and Transport Authority (RTA) has started to run real-time updates of bus timetables on Google Maps in collaboration with Google Inc, becoming the first city in the Middle East to use open data in public transport on par with 100 other smart cities across the globe.

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The Value of Data

There are many unanswered questions about data: who controls or accesses it, how to govern it, how much it is worth and who has the rights to that value? Much of the debate to date has focused in general terms on either the privacy costs of the growing use of online data or the broad economic potential of its use, but the creation of value from data of different kinds, and its capture by different entities, need to be better understood for effective policy.

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Source: https://bit.ly/2TNlGDf

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